Behind on Blogs….some recent mentions

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We have had a couple of recent reviews and mentions, the first from NYC-based Hoptopia of our XDry Still Cider (perhaps our cider maker’s favorite offering).

RELEASE: Year Round
THE ABV. 7.5% | IBU’s. ?
THE NOSE: Musk, Tarragon, Leather, Gooseberry, Pear Juice
THE TASTE: Radish, White Cranberry, Pineapple, Dill Pickle, Iceberg Lettuce
THE BOTTOMLINE: The aroma of dark leafy woodlands and soft autumnal orchard fruit are immediate on this uniquely still and long dry cider. Clean refreshing vegetable flavors and the cut of tart berries rule the palate. A little tropical fruit sweetness is present mid drink before a lengthy arid white wine dryness unfolds, priming the taste buds for the next satiating sip.
THE BACKBONE: Apples
PRICE POINT: $15 | 1x 750ml bottle
Hoptopia rated the cider 90 points.
Another blogosphere mention came from NH native Jason on his Ancient Fire Wine Blog, and happened to recommend a still cider to be paired with a fantastic-sounding strawberry rhubarb pie. Here’s what Jason shared….
I found a recipe for an all rhubarb pie in my Foodbuzz feed this week. It comes to us from the Foy Update blog. I have never made a 100% rhubarb pie before and the one time I have used it in pie I cut it with strawberry. Check it out at http://www.foodbuzz.com/blogs/2258418-rhubarb-pie-recipe. Family recipes (from the post if you didn’t read it) are real gems because they have likely been tried so many times and if ever there was a fix needed it has surely been done. These recipes work! I am going to have to seek out some local rhubarb and make a tasty pie that will of course have the homemade crust everyone is always fighting over…

I was thinking about what to pair the pie with…I am going to recommend hard cider and the still (no bubbles) type specifically. I make one like this with some residual sweetness that should match well with both the sweet and sour from this pie. The apple flavor will settle in nicely with the rhubarb as well. The most recent batches of cider were made from several styles of yeast and the Sweet Mead yeast in particular imparted a nice nutty background to the beverage. I think that would work nicely here as well.

Good cider might be hard to find in many places and there are several suggestions I have for that. First off, if do you live near an apple growing region there will most definitely be cider makers around. Seek them out and try their products. I live in NH and our best cider makers are the folks at Farnum Hill Ciders which you can check out at http://www.povertylaneorchards.com/.

So keep the reviews, recipes and other ramblings coming.
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